The Attention Consortium helps support the 2017 Dartmouth College Brain Bee

The 5th Annual Brain Bee was a great success! 

 PBS Graduate Student and EPSCoR Attention Consortium Member, Kirsten Ziman, TEACHING the public about EEG recordings using a  3D printed headset during the Brain Bee on April 22nd, 2017 at Dartmouth College.

PBS Graduate Student and EPSCoR Attention Consortium Member, Kirsten Ziman, TEACHING the public about EEG recordings using a  3D printed headset during the Brain Bee on April 22nd, 2017 at Dartmouth College.

The Upper Valley Brain Bee is a fun, interactive neuroscience fair along with a friendly neuroscience competition open to teens age 13-19 living in New Hampshire and Vermont. Hosted by Dartmouth faculty and graduate students, we hope to show students the fun in learning about the brain and to provide an opportunity to experience what the field of neuroscience is all about!

The Brain Bee, which is open to the public, includes an interactive neuroscience fair with demonstration booths followed by a hands-on, brain-friendly competition. All students will receive a certificate of participation recognized by the International Brain Bee, and prizes will be awarded to the top five competitors.

The Brain Bee competition is divided into two rounds.

  • All competitors participate in the first round. It has three sections:

    • Written question

    • A neuroanatomy practical

    • Case-based diagnoses

  • The five top-scoring participants from the first round are selected to compete in the second round. It is a trivia-style competition (think Jeopardy) where Dartmouth neuroscience faculty quiz the competitors on their knowledge about the brain.

All competitors are responsible for understanding and abiding by the rules and regulations laid down by the International Brain Bee organization. This includes, but is not limited to, age restrictions and number of local competitions. If you have a question regarding eligibility, feel free to contact one of our Coordinators.

This event was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant # 1632738.

Learn more about the Brain Bee here.